UN Foundation and Devex -- Making the Millennium Development Goals Happen Making the Millennium Development Goals Happen 2010-12-08T19:17:42Z http://mdg.devex.com/feed/atom/ WordPress Administrator <![CDATA[Achieving Universal Primary School Access]]> http://mdg.devex.com/?p=104 2010-09-09T07:46:04Z 2010-06-03T03:21:51Z The United Nations Foundation, in collaboration with Devex, would like to hear from you about your experience increasing primary school attendance for girls and boys. This is a unique opportunity for those on the front lines of the global fight against poverty to tell policymakers what is going on in the field – which approaches have proven successful, and which challenges remain... More ]]>

Photo by: Kate Cummings

By Rolf Rosenkraz, September 7, 2010

Ten years ago, world leaders affirmed the importance of primary education for a country’s development when they agreed to push for universal access by 2015. Progress toward this ambitious target has been impressive, despite the many challenges posed by conflict, and financial calamities and other issues.

At least 20 developing countries have already met their targets on primary education – Kiribati, Vietnam and Azerbaijan even exceeded them more than 10-fold, according to a working paper published by the Center for Global Development. Several countries that required significant improvements over their 1990s baselines – such as Benin, Mali and Mauritania – are now more than two-thirds toward reaching the so-called Millennium Development Goal 2: achieve universal primary education. But many are struggling.

To ensure all girls and boys attend school, a multitude of strategies – new and old – are being implemented from Afghanistan to Zambia. Some countries – such as Kenya, which passed a new constitution this year – guarantee tuition-free primary school. In others, parents are being paid for sending their kids, and especially girls, to school instead of having them work at home, on the street or the farm. Initiatives such One Laptop per Child are seeking to narrow the digital divide.

While many of these initiatives have shown success, they tend to come with an asterisk: Even if school is free, what if clothing, food and books aren’t? Are payment schemes such as “conditional cash transfers” to parents sustainable? Do children in Africa need the Internet more than clean water and continuing education?

World leaders are gathering later this month to take stock of the fight against major diseases. The Sept. 20-22 United Nations Millennium Development Goals Summit in New York promises to revitalize and refocus the international community on proven strategies for educating girls and boys.

This is a unique opportunity for those on the front lines to tell policymakers what is going on in the field – which approaches have proven successful, and which challenges remain.

Tell us how your work is helping to achieve universal primary school access. Your experience and knowledge is key to one of the most important initiatives of our time.

Join. Be Heard.Start posting your comments, challenges and success stories now!

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Oliver Subasinghe, Devex Moderator http://www.devex.com/people/252421-oliver <![CDATA[Ways to Advance a Global Partnership for Development]]> http://wp.fliptopbox.com/?p=74 2010-12-08T19:17:42Z 2010-05-31T13:31:23Z ... More]]> Photo by: Joao Araujo / U.N.

Photo by: Joao Araujo / U.N.

By Rolf Rosenkranz

Partnership has taken on a new meaning – and importance – as cash-strapped donors struggle to maintain momentum toward achieving the Millennium Development Goals, new donors emerge in the Middle East and elsewhere, and companies and nonprofits become increasingly willing to share resources.

With the rising number of organizations involved in international development come challenges and opportunities: A social entrepreneur may have an easier time finding an investor for that cutting edge gadget which may change lives in rural Africa and beyond. A nonprofit group may relish the thought of winning funding not just from its country’s main bilateral donor agency, but co-financing it with money from foreign donors and nontraditional sources such as foundations and companies engaging in corporate social responsibility initiatives. Donors are having an easier time finding partners in the developing world as capacity is being built there.

At the same time, finding the right partner and building a sustainable partnership remains a challenge.

Ten years ago, world leaders enshrined the importance of partnership in their Millennium Declaration, which set ambitious targets to reduce poverty and hunger by 2015. Progress toward these Millennium Development Goals has been impressive, despite the many challenges posed by conflict, and financial calamities and other issues.

MDG 8 calls for a global partnership for development. More specifically, the declared goal is to leverage the private sector in making the benefits of new technologies, especially information and communications technologies, available to the developing world, and to work with pharmaceutical companies to provide access to affordable medications around the globe. MDG 8 also suggests advancing an open, rule-based, predictable, non-discriminatory trading and financial system, dealing comprehensively with the debt problems of developing countries, and addressing the special needs of least developed, landlocked and island countries.

Development professionals like you – whether you work in a multilateral agency, a bilateral donor, a consultancy, nonprofit or by yourself – are involved in partnerships every day. The United Nations Foundation, in collaboration with Devex, would like to hear from you about your work on partnerships that have proven successful in the field.
Take part in the last part of the UNF-Devex conversation on the MDGs. Tell us how your work is helping to achieve MDG 8 and create a global partnership for development. Your experience and knowledge is key to one of the most important initiatives of our time.

Join. Be Heard. Start posting your comments, challenges and success stories now!

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Oliver Subasinghe, Devex Moderator http://www.devex.com/people/252421-oliver <![CDATA[Make Your Voice Heard: How to Eradicate Extreme Poverty and Hunger]]> http://wp.fliptopbox.com/?p=24 2010-10-01T17:50:24Z 2010-05-20T00:37:04Z ... More]]>

Children have lunch at an Orphanage in Juba, Sudan. Photo: Arpan Munier/ UN Photo.

The United Nations Foundation, in collaboration with Devex, would like to hear from you about your experience working toward the Millennium Development Goals.

Ten years ago, world leaders set ambitious targets for reducing poverty and improving social and economic conditions around the globe by 2015. Progress toward achieving the eight Millennium Development Goals has been impressive, despite the many challenges posed by conflict, climate change and financial calamities.

World leaders are gathering again this year to map out the homestretch of this momentous campaign. The Sept. 20-22 United Nations Millennium Development Goals Summit in New York promises to revitalize and refocus the international community on proven strategies for eliminating hunger, reducing poverty and boosting labor.

This is a unique opportunity for those on the front lines of the global fight against poverty to tell policymakers what is going on in the field – which approaches have proven successful, and which challenges remain.

In the coming weeks, the United Nations Foundation and Devex will invite contributions on each of the Millennium Development Goals, one at a time. The debate will span a variety of topics from environmental sustainability to maternal health and universal education.

The debate begins right here, right now – on Goal 1: to eradicate extreme poverty and hunger. The target is to halve, between 1990 and 2015, the proportion of people who suffer from hunger and whose income is less than $1 per day, and to achieve full and decent work for all.

The international development community plays a critical role in achieving these targets, through initiatives large and small. 

Tell us how your work is helping to eradicate extreme poverty and hunger. Your experience and knowledge is key to one of the most important initiatives of our time.

Join. Be Heard. Start posting your comments and success stories now!

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Oliver Subasinghe, Devex Moderator http://www.devex.com/people/252421-oliver <![CDATA[Extreme Hunger: Small Farmers to the Rescue?]]> http://wp.fliptopbox.com/?p=21 2010-06-16T02:33:23Z 2010-05-18T23:42:26Z ...More]]> Photo by: Ray Witlin / World Bank

Photo by: Ray Witlin / World Bank

Posted by Devex Moderator

Helping small farmers become more productive is the focus of recent global anti-hunger efforts. Such initiatives maybe crucial to achieving the first millennium development goal.

For example, small farmers in Uganda are receiving aid to grow and market coffee as a cash crop. By growing cash crops, farmers can feed their families, generate greater income and increase the food supply.

Small farmers in the developing world must overcome steep challenges such as lack of market access, high quality seeds and poor infrastructure. Droughts and other climate related issues compound these challenges.

Overall, agricultural investment and aid have seen an increase over the last few years after being neglected for decades by governments and donors. Also, more enlightened food aid programs aimed at breaking dependency on donors are emerging.

A growing number of partnerships between agribusiness, micro-lenders, donors and scientists are trying to address hunger holistically.

But, will improving the livelihoods of small farmers help tackle hunger? How is your organization helping to address food insecurity? What success or set-backs have you faced? How might policymakers reduce hunger?

Join. Be Heard. Start posting your comments and success stories now!

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Administrator <![CDATA[How to Ensure Environmental Sustainability?]]> http://wp.fliptopbox.com/?p=19 2010-11-17T20:53:17Z 2010-05-19T06:41:37Z More]]>

By Rolf Rosenkranz

Environmental degradation has the potential to undo much of the good work done by aid workers around the globe. And as threats to our environment increasingly pressure our growing world population, development professionals of all stripes are working hard on solutions.

The United Nations recognized the economic value of thriving ecosystems in its 2004 Millennium Ecosystem Assessment, a landmark review of products and services such as clean drinking water and the decomposition of waste. Many aid initiatives, such as the Millennium Villages Project, have declared environmental sustainability a key component of rural development. Others are leveraging international capital markets and local micro-enterprises to promote environmental sustainability.

These are complex issues. Many ecosystem services, for instance, are being directly degraded because sustainable energy resources are lacking: Health, water and agriculture systems may suffer where wood is cut for charcoal or electricity is lacking, for instance.

Ten years ago, world leaders set ambitious targets for reducing poverty and improving environmental sustainability around the globe by 2015. Progress toward achieving the eight Millennium Development Goals has been impressive, despite the many challenges posed by conflict, climate change and financial calamities.

The United Nations Foundation, in collaboration with Devex, would like to hear from you about your experience working toward Millennium Development Goal 7, which calls for MDG 7 calls for the integration of sustainable development principles into country policies and programs to reverse the loss of environmental resources and to halve, by 2015, the proportion of the population without sustainable access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation. It also calls for the improvement of living conditions for at least 100 million slum dwellers and urban poor.

This is a unique opportunity for those on the front lines of the global fight for environmental sustainability to tell policymakers what is going on in the field – which approaches have proven successful, and which challenges remain.

The international development community plays a critical role in promoting environmental sustainability, through initiatives large and small. Tell us how your work is helping. Your experience and knowledge is key to one of the most important initiatives of our time.

Join. Be Heard. Start posting your comments and success stories now!

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Oliver Subasinghe, Devex Moderator http://www.devex.com/people/252421-oliver <![CDATA[Combating HIV-AIDS, Malaria and Other Diseases]]> http://wp.fliptopbox.com/?p=17 2010-09-08T02:00:51Z 2010-05-18T23:40:57Z The United Nations Foundation, in collaboration with Devex, would like to hear from you about your experience combating HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases. This is a unique opportunity for those on the front lines of the global fight against poverty to tell policymakers what is going on in the field – which approaches have proven successful, and which challenges remain... More]]> By lxtla

Photo by Valentina Buj/ CC BY SA

By Rolf Rosenkranz on 9 August 2010

HIV-AIDS, malaria and other diseases not only threaten the lives of millions of people around the globe – they also hamper economic growth and international development. They not only bring tragedy to one person, but also to their community and country.

This understanding has fueled a growing international battle against HIV and other major diseases. Lately, however, concerns have also grown about new approaches taken by some of the world’s largest donors, including the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria and the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief.

Ten years ago, world leaders set ambitious targets for reversing the spread of HIV, malaria, tuberculosis and other diseases by 2015 and achieving universal access to HIV-AIDS treatment by this year. Progress toward achieving these – and other – Millennium Development Goals has been impressive, despite the many challenges posed by conflict, climate change and financial calamities.

But the aid community is also faced with a host of fundamental questions, such as these: Will more people die as funding levels off, or have we just got more effective at negotiating lower drug prices, or more efficient at producing insecticide-treated mosquito nets? Should there be a greater focus on disease prevention or treatment? How can cultural and religious issues be addressed that affect the spread of sexually transmitted diseases such as AIDS?

World leaders are gathering later this year to take stock of the fight against major diseases. The Sept. 20-22 United Nations Millennium Development Goals Summit in New York promises to revitalize and refocus the international community on proven strategies for educating youth and women about disease, for reducing mother-to-child transmissions, and for delivering proper medication to people in need.

This is a unique opportunity for those on the front lines of the global fight against HIV-AIDS and other major diseases to tell policymakers what is going on in the field – which approaches have proven successful, and which challenges remain.

Tell us how your work is helping to reverse the spread of HIV-AIDS, malaria and other diseases. Your experience and knowledge is key to one of the most important initiatives of our time.

Join. Be Heard.Start posting your comments, challenges and success stories now!

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Administrator <![CDATA[How to Improve Maternal Health Around the Globe]]> http://wp.fliptopbox.com/?p=15 2010-10-05T18:35:14Z 2010-05-19T06:40:22Z More]]>

Photo by: International AIDS Alliance

By Rolf Rosenkranz

For years, progress on the Millennium Development Goal of improving maternal health was painfully slow. Now, MDG 5 has become the cornerstone of a new global health strategy which is expected to be the engine that propels progress toward all eight goals.

It was a focal point at the Sept. 20-22 United Nations High-Level Plenary on the Millennium Development Goals. It is central to U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s Global Strategy for Women’s and Children’s Health, unveiled with much fanfare at the summit. And it was the subject of a series of financial, services and policy commitments by key donors, developing nations and civil society leaders.

True, the rate of maternal and newborn mortality has decreased, especially in countries like India. Access to reproductive health services is increasingly seen as a human right, and leaders from the developing and industrialized world have pledged to provide free care to pregnant women and young mothers.

But will all of this new attention be enough to reach MDG 5 targets, achieve universal access to reproductive health and reduce the maternal mortality ratio by three quarters between 1990 and 2015?

The United Nations Foundation, in collaboration with Devex, would like to hear from you about your experience in improving maternal health around the globe. This is a unique opportunity for those on the front lines of the global fight against poverty to tell policymakers what is going on in the field – which approaches have proven successful, and what challenges remain.

Tell us how your work is helping to boost maternal health. Your experience and knowledge is key to one of the most important initiatives of our time.

Join. Be heard. Start posting your comments, challenges and success stories now!

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Administrator <![CDATA[Finding New Ways to Empower Women]]> http://wp.fliptopbox.com/?p=10 2010-08-08T20:29:33Z 2010-05-19T06:24:24Z ... More]]>

Photo by: The Asia Foundation

The United Nations Foundation, in collaboration with Devex, would like to hear from you about your experience promoting gender equality and empowering women.

Ten years ago, world leaders set ambitious targets for reducing poverty and improving social and economic conditions around the globe by 2015. Progress toward achieving the eight Millennium Development Goals has been impressive, despite the many challenges posed by conflict, climate change and financial calamities.

World leaders are gathering again this year to map out the homestretch of this momentous campaign. The Sept. 20-22 United Nations Millennium Development Goals Summit in New York promises to revitalize and refocus the international community on proven strategies for eliminating hunger, reducing poverty and boosting labor.

This is a unique opportunity for those on the front lines of the global fight against poverty to tell policymakers what is going on in the field – which approaches have proven successful, and which challenges remain.

The United Nations Foundation and Devex are hosting a conversation on each of the Millennium Development Goals, one at a time. It began in early June on Goal 1: to eradicate extreme poverty and hunger.

And the conversation continues today – on Goal 3: to promote gender equality and empower women. The target is to even the ratio of girls to boys in primary, secondary and tertiary education, increase the share of women holding paid jobs in the non-agricultural sector, and boost the proportion of seats held by women in national parliaments.

The international development community plays a critical role in achieving these targets, through initiatives large and small – from those strengthening health care and expanding women’s property and inheritance rights to others focused on boosting infrastructure and trade.

Tell us how your work is helping to promote gender equality and empower women. Your experience and knowledge is key to one of the most important initiatives of our time.

Join. Be Heard. Start posting your comments and success stories now!

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Administrator <![CDATA[How to Reduce Child Mortality]]> http://wp.fliptopbox.com/?p=8 2010-11-02T20:22:48Z 2010-05-19T06:24:03Z More]]>

Photo by: Khadivi / UN

By Rolf Rosenkranz

Children are our future, it is often said. But around the world, too many children are still dying because of a vicious cycle created by poverty, conflict and a lack of adequate health care.

Healthy children are the cornerstone of a new global health strategy unveiled at the Sept. 20-22 United Nations Millennium Development Goals Summit in New York by United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon.

The United Nations Foundation, in collaboration with Devex, would like to hear from you about your experience working toward Millennium Development Goal 4 and reducing by two-thirds, between 1990 and 2015, the under-five mortality rate.

This is a unique opportunity for those on the front lines of the global fight against poverty to tell policymakers what is going on in the field – which approaches have proven successful, and which challenges remain.

The international development community plays a critical role in improving child health, through initiatives large and small – from campaigns against pneumonia, diarrhea and measles to those meant to improve nutrition.

Tell us how your work is helping to improve the health of children. Your experience and knowledge is key to one of the most important initiatives of our time.

Join. Be Heard. Start posting your comments and success stories now!

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